Living My Moment Blog- April 2011
Creating Balance as a Mompreneur

Christian Career Center- Reinvent your career
Reinvent Your Career

The Weekly-December 2010
Marybeth Maly Reeves of Scrapbook Mamma named one of Startup Nation's "2010 Leading Moms In Business"
Successful Mompreneuer Creates Scrapbooks While Taking Care of Quadruplets


IMDiversity.com Career Women Remade
Career Women, Remade

City Town Info-February 2010 Recession Spawning New Entrepreneurs
Recession Spawning New Entreprenuers

Start Up Nation-Turn your hobby into a business Article
From Hobby to Business, Moms Take Their Pastimes Full-Time
When MaryBeth Reeves launched Atlanta-based Scrapbookmamma, ranked No. 23 in the 2009 StartupNation Leading Moms in Business competition, she wasn't looking for a new job. She actually had a full-time job with Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide and had been working in the industry for the past 20 years.


Small Business Chronicle
Examples of Good Ideas turning into businesses

Scrapbook Mamma Press Release
MARYBETH MALY REEVES OF SCRAPBOOK MAMMA NAMED ONE OF STARTUP NATION'S "2010 LEADING MOMS IN BUSINESS"
MaryBeth Maly Reeves, owner of the Norcross-based Scrapbook Mamma, was ranked #13 in StartupNation.com's 2010 Leading Moms in Business competition,s sponsored by Infusionsoft.

Over 709,000 votes were cast in the 2010 contest, and Reeves was the highest ranked woman in the Atlanta metropolitan area.


January 2010

Turning Your Passions Into Profit
Consumer Reporter Kim Fettig shows us how three local women are turning their passions into profit.



Sept 23, 2009
Day-Night-profit Blog


Home Business Start-Up Idea: Turn Your Hobby Into A Business
... Whenever possible, start out on a small scale to test the waters. MaryBeth Reeves of launched ScrapBookMamma after years of making fabulous scrapbook creations for friends and family. She did it part time for some extra spending money until she was laid off, and that gave her the impetus to ramp things up...



August 27, 2009

Do You Want to Be Your Own Boss?

... MaryBeth Reeves does just that. After getting laid off from her corporate position in December 2008, she changed gears. As a mother to quadruplet daughters, spending time and making memories with her family was vital, and she figured other working mothers felt the same.

"I decided to look at this development as an opportunity to be my own boss, to do something I love to do, that will also allow me to spend more time with my family," Reeves says. "I started a business making custom photo books and scrapbooks for people who like the idea, but don't have the time or desire to make one themselves. Scrapbook Mamma creates books using digital images or traditional photographs. As a bonus, I put [the images] on a CD and make a slide show set to music so they can enjoy their memories a variety of ways."



July 21, 2009

STRATA Member - MaryBeth Reeves, Scrapbok Mamma

MaryBeth Reeves is the Founder of Scrapbook Mamma, where she makes custom art quality photo books with personal photos for people who want a unique and creative keepsake, but don’t have the time or inclination to do it themselves. What sets her apart from other photo book sites, is she does the work for you. MaryBeth will take your photos, art work, poems, or anything else you wish and create a one of a kind books that help to honor your memories...



July 2009

Scrapbook Mamma founder is top mompreneur

Mary Beth Reeves, Norcross, has been selected as one of the country's best 200 mompreneurs. Reeves runs Scrapbook Mamma from her home, while taking care of her quadruplet daughters.

Her company was named one of the top 200 mom-based businesses in the Leading Moms in Business competition, finishing in 23rd place, top from the state of Georgia and metro Atlanta. The contest was sponsored by Internet firms StartupNation and VerticalResponse. They report that from January through March, the public cast more than 600,000 votes for thousands of contestants before naming the winners...



June 2009

Edy's Taste of Recovery

MaryBeth Reeves worked for a large hotel chain as a corporate trainer, but when the company downsized, Reeves lost her job. She first pursued other corporate positions but soon she realized the corporate world was not where her interests lay. Reeves decided to challenge herself and pursue an alternative career path that would allow her to channel her creative side. With help from the media company, Women Who Launch, Reeves put her plan into action and began her own scrapbooking business, Scrapbook Mamma, which creates custom-made digital scrapbooks. While the road has not always been smooth, it has been rewarding, and today Reeves is doing something she loves while having more time to spend with her family.



June 2009


Start-Up Success Stories: Scrapbook Mamma


May 15, 2009
The Council on Biblical Manhood & Womanhood

The Wall Street Journal recently published an interesting article on success-driven, career-minded women, whose desires radically change upon having children. The story is illustrated by one such woman who dropped her career and started a business out of the home so she could be at home with her daughters:

“Mary Beth Reeves, of Atlanta, had worked her way up to a high-level training and development position at Starwood Hotels & Resorts when she found out she was pregnant with quadruplet girls." I was career driven and competitive," she recalls. "I'd get on a plane to go to a meeting at a moment's notice, and once there, I'd stick around longer to have drinks..."



May 12, 2009


The Wall Street Journal

Career Women, Remade
By ALEXANDRA LEVIT

It wasn't too long ago that women began taking sledgehammers to the glass ceilings of corporate America. In the years that followed, women were allowed into the privileged society of male executives, and as they marched up the ladder and commanded high salaries, everyone cheered. Even so, some powerful women wondered what they had gotten into.

"A lot of women found that the male model of success -- with its emphasis on full time and face time, extensive investment during the thirtysomething years, and money as the primary motivator -- didn't work for them," says Kathy Caprino, a work-life coach and author of "Breakdown, Breakthrough: The Professional Woman's Guide to Claiming a Life of Passion, Power, and Purpose."

Mary Beth Reeves, of Atlanta, had worked her way up to a high-level training and development position at Starwood Hotels & Resorts when she found out she was pregnant with quadruplet girls. "I was career driven and competitive," she recalls. "I'd get on a plane to go to a meeting at a moment's notice, and once there, I'd stick around longer to have drinks."

But once her daughters were born, Ms. Reeves, then 37, says her priorities changed. "I didn't need the prestigious title, and I wanted to do my job and go home."

Seeking meaningful work as well as more personal time, Ms. Reeves, now 40, created a new career on her own terms. She launched her own business, Scrapbook Mamma, which develops custom photo books.

She employs a nanny to help with her daughters while she runs her business from home. "Necessity was the cause of my reinvention," she says. "I'd been happy in my hospitality career, but then one day, I wasn't."

If you're a mid-career woman who wants to make a change, where should you begin? First, it's important to consider the type of work you're drawn to, and then think through the details. For example, you may want to work for yourself because you think that will provide you with more time for family. But in some entrepreneurial ventures, you will end up working more hours and with more stress than in most corporate jobs.

Try interviewing other women who have succeeded and failed at what you want to do. They can provide a reality check regarding the day-to-day life of your prospective career path and assist you in overcoming challenging emotions like fear and insecurity. For mid-career women who aren't accustomed to negotiating or advocating for themselves, empowered mentors can make the difference between succeeding -- or not.

As you move forward with your reinvention, keep in mind that you don't have to emulate superwoman. While you are setting up a situation that will provide you with better work-life balance in the long term, your focus may need to be primarily on your career. You shouldn't feel guilty about asking for help.

"Women do more in their lives than is appropriate and healthy, but they need to empower their families to take on more of the demands of the household," says Ms. Caprino.



May 4, 2009



MaryBeth, congratulations again on being named one of the Top 200 Winners in the 2009 StartupNation Leading Moms in Business competition. Featured Stories

We also encourage you to read the feature stories we added to StartupNation.com that profiles some of the key trends and notable winners in the 2009 ranking.

Scrapbook Mamma ranked # 23 among several thousand contestants

A Norcross resident has been selected as one of the country’s best 200 mompreneurs. Mary Beth Reeves, 40, runs Scrapbook Mamma from her home, while taking care of her four children---quadruplet daughters, all who will turn three in a few weeks.

Her company was named one of the top 200 mom-based businesses in the Leading Moms in Business competition, finishing in 23rd place, top from the state of Georgia and Atlanta. The contest was sponsored by two Internet firms, StartupNation (www.startupnation.com) and VerticalResponse (www.verticalresponse.com). They report that from January through March, the public cast more than 600,000 votes for thousands of contestants before naming the winners.

"Moms across America were honored in this year’s ranking, showing that they’re capable of starting and running successful businesses while managing to balance family, career, home and self," said Rich Sloan, co-founder of StartupNation."Well over 600,000 votes were cast in support of several thousand contestants. What an incredible achievement to be named a winner, and what an inspiration for anyone looking to start their own business.”

What do they win? Bragging rights, promotional support, and digital winner’s emblems recognizing their achievements as the Leading Moms in Business.

"It’s challenging for anyone to start and run a successful business – particularly in this economy,” said Janine Popick, founder and CEO of VerticalResponse. “These women are setting the standard for innovation and creativity.”

When Reeves started creating scrapbooks in 2003, she was a newlywed and a full-time employee of Starwood Hotels and Resorts with 20 years of experience in the industry. Her first creation was a book featuring the professional photos from her wedding.

Three years later, Reeves returned to scrapbooking. In 2006, she gave birth to quadruplet daughters, and “like all new parents, I was obsessed with taking pictures of my babies,” she says. “And I had four of them to focus on!”

To share pictures of her children in an organized way, she created photo books as Christmas presents for family members. “People loved them,” she says. “Everyone said how great it would be to have a photo book with their pictures if only someone else would do the work.”

Over the next eight months, Reeves wrote a business plan, launched a website and snagged her first order. Although the hobby was clearly presenting itself as a viable business, she continued working full time in a job she loved. Scrapbooking didn’t enter the realm of “full-time career” until she was laid off from Starwood last December.

“It was sooner than I had planned, but I jumped in with both feet working for myself and decided to make a go of it,” Reeves said.


Sunday, April 05, 2009


Take the career leap!
By Laura Raines
For the AJC

Do you have a long-held career dream? Are you waiting until you have the money, the time and conditions to be right with the universe to leap into it?

...

Three weeks before Christmas, MaryBeth Reeves was downsized from her job as corporate trainer for Starwood Hotels. She had other corporate job offers, but decided to invest fully in her passion for making custom-printed scrapbooks for individuals and companies.

“I had been working toward leaving corporate life,” said Reeves, the mother of 2-year-old quadruplet daughters, “but was scared to pull the trigger. When I was laid off, I figured it was for a reason. I thought if I don’t take this chance now, I’ll never take it.”

She had already turned her hobby into a business, Scrapbook Mamma, with help from Women Who Launch, a media company that provides resources and connections for women entrepreneurs.

“I went to a seminar where I heard from other women pursuing their dreams and got a lot of practical ideas and advice,” Reeves said.

She loves that she can work creatively and has more time with her husband and girls.

“I like being a part of the special times in people’s lives and giving them something that makes them cry,” she said. “I’m still figuring out the financial part, but I’ve learned that you can’t wait until everything’s right to do what you want. Even starting out wrong is better than not starting.”



CareerApple
MaryBeth was featured as one of CareerApple's Inspiring People. Read more...

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